Principal Investigator

tobias.egner at duke.edu

tobias.egner at duke.edu

Tobias Egner, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience
Director of Graduate Studies, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience

Tobias received a B.Sc. in Psychology from Goldsmiths College, University of London, and then went on to earn his Ph.D. in Cognitive Neuroscience at Imperial College London, University of London. After that, he undertook postdoctoral research at the Functional MRI Research Center at Columbia University in New York City before working as a Research Assistant Professor in the Cognitive Neurology & Alzheimer's Disease center at Northwestern University in Chicago. In summer 2009, he joined the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at Duke University.

For more information, download Tobias Egner's CV.


Postdoctoral Associates

Nick Brosowsky, Ph.D.

nicholaus.brosowsky at duke.edu

nicholaus.brosowsky at duke.edu

Nick earned BA and MA in Psychology from the University of Manitoba, where he studied auditory attention and music perception under Dr. Todd Mondor. He earned a Ph.D. in Psychology from the The Graduate Center of the City University of New York where he worked in the Human Cognition and Performance Lab at Brooklyn College under Dr. Matthew Crump studying attention, cognitive control, skilled human performance, and music cognition.

Nick’s research interests include adaptive cognitive control (How do people learn to ignore distractions?), skill-learning (How do people learn to play a musical instrument?), inattention (Why do people mind wander?), and creativity (How does flexible control facilitate creativity?).

https://nbrosowsky.github.io/

 
tanya.wen at duke.edu

tanya.wen at duke.edu

Tanya Wen, Ph.D.

Tanya received her bachelor’s degree from National Cheng Kung University in 2015. She completed her Ph.D. at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge in 2019.

Tanya is interested in how the brain assembles the required cognitive operations for complex behavior. Task organization is often hierarchical, with smaller events forming larger temporal episodes, situation models, or semantic categories. A focus of her research is to understand how different brain regions represent these varying levels of information in human experience. She investigates these topics using various methodologies (behavioral, EEG/MEG, and fMRI).


Graduate Students

christina.bejjani at duke.edu

christina.bejjani at duke.edu

Christina Bejjani

Christina received a B.A. in Neuroscience from Pomona College in 2013. She worked as a research assistant at UCLA before becoming a lab manager for the Learning and Decision Making lab at Rutgers University, Newark in 2014. She joined the Egner lab as a Psychology & Neuroscience graduate student in 2016.

Christina is interested in how learning and memory interact and work hand-in-hand with control processes to guide adaptive behavior. She plans to investigate these topics using various methodologies (behavior, modeling, fMRI, TMS).

http://christinabejjani.com

 
eva.gjorgieva at duke.edu

eva.gjorgieva at duke.edu

Eva Gjorgieva

Eva graduated from Loyola University Chicago in 2015 with a B.S. in Psychology and minor in Neuroscience. She was a research assistant at the Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Lab at Loyola, and then went on to work for the Gottfried Lab at Northwestern.

Eva is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Cognitive Neuroscience under the supervision of Drs. Marty Woldorff, Roberto Cabeza, and Tobias Egner. Her research focuses on the ways in which interactions between internally-directed and externally-directed attention are coordinated as a function of intentionality and how this predicts subsequent memory. In addition, Eva is interested in understanding post-error adjustments in attention and cognitive control and their influence on memory.

 
audrey.liu at duke.edu

audrey.liu at duke.edu

Audrey Liu

Audrey graduated from Claremont McKenna College in 2018 with a B.A. in Psychology. She is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Cognitive Neuroscience under the supervision of Drs. Tobias Egner and Marty Woldorff.

Audrey is interested in control parameters that underlie our ability to mediate the tradeoff between cognitive flexibility and stability, and how we adapt cognitive states to learned environmental demands. She plans to investigate these questions through behavioral, EEG, and fMRI designs.

 
peter.whitehead at duke.edu

peter.whitehead at duke.edu

Peter Whitehead

Peter received a B.Mus in Orchestral Performance - Bassoon and a B.S. in Psychology from Arizona State University in 2016. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in Cognitive Neuroscience in the Egner lab and Woldorff lab.

Peter is interested in how working memory influences attention and actions, and how control processes can modulate these influences. He plans to investigate these topics using various methodologies (behavior, EEG, and modeling).

http://pswhitehead.com


Lab Manager

jack.dolgin at duke.edu

jack.dolgin at duke.edu

Jack Dolgin

Jack received a B.S. in Psychology from Duke University in 2018. At Duke he worked in the Cognitive Behavioral Research and Treatment Program and then in the Huettel Lab.

Broadly, he thinks he is interested in the study of intelligence and individual differences, but he is still unsure, and he promises to update his bio when he knows more.


Undergraduate Students

younis.mahmoud at duke.edu

younis.mahmoud at duke.edu

Younis Mahmoud

Younis is a junior majoring in Neuroscience and minoring in Philosophy. His current research interests are broad, but Younis is interested in applying ethical and philosophical inquiry in scientific research.

He is curious about topics such as philosophy of mind and cognitive neuroscience.

 
benjamin.romero at duke.edu

benjamin.romero at duke.edu

Benny Romero

Benny is a junior majoring in Neuroscience with a certificate in Latina/o studies. He worked in a psycholinguistic lab researching bilingualism this past summer at the University of Texas at Austin.

Benny’s research interests in neuroscience are decision-making as well as the cognitive phenomena behind artificial intelligence behavior. He is also interested in how physical activity influences well-being.

 
vineethsubbu. somasundaram at duke.edu

vineethsubbu. somasundaram at duke.edu

Vin Somasundaram

Vin is a sophomore majoring in Neuroscience and Computer Science. He is curious about the field combining the application of both of these realms.

He is interested in the area of neuroscience focused on decision-making and wants to learn more about the hierarchy of information. He eventually wants to use computer science to progress this field by simulating human decision-making and behavioral motives.

 
ziwei.zhang1 at duke.edu

ziwei.zhang1 at duke.edu

Ziwei Zhang

Ziwei is a senior double-majoring in Neuroscience and Psychology. She is interested in the complex executive control processes of the human brain and specifically, how these processes can be facilitated by different types of manipulations.

Ziwei is currently working with Christina to investigate the role of subliminal cueing on prepared control. She hopes to receive a Ph.D. in cognitive science in the future.


Alumni

Yu-Chin Chiu Assistant Professor, Purdue University, USA

Anthony Sali Assistant Professor, Wake Forest University, USA

Amelia M. Abbott-Frey - MD Candidate, Columbia University Medical School, USA

Hanna Oh Descher - Data Scientist, Microsoft, USA

Paul Muhle-Karbe - Postdoctoral Scholar, Oxford University, UK & Stanford University, USA

Jiefeng Jiang - Assistant Professor, University of Iowa, USA

Emma Wu Dowd - Senior Research Program Coordinator, The University of Texas at Austin, USA

Anastasia Kiyonaga - Assistant Professor, University of California, San Diego, USA

Franziska KorbPostdoctoral Scholar & Lecturer, Dresden University of Technology, Germany

Joseph King - Postdoctoral Scholar, Dresden University of Technology, Germany

Darinka Trübutschek - Postdoctoral Scholar, Oxford University, UK